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protector2814
12-28-2010, 01:52 PM
So, maybe a year ago, I start smelling sewage in my basement laundry room. I have the plumbers out a few times. They couldn't find anything, yet the smell persists and I just feel in my bones that something is terribly wrong. Long story short - we have our heating and cooling system replaced a month back ($$$) and the tech. smells the smell and traces in to the trap door behind our basement tub. Ten days ago, the plumbers come in with the jack hammers and, after tearing up our laundry room and basement bath floor, that our house has settled on the back side, crushing and snapping the brittle, 50 year old pipes connecting just about everything to the sewer line. Everything we've flushed or washed down a sink for gosh knows how long, has ended up in the ground below our home, further washing away the ground, causing even more settling and damage.

They've replaced pretty much everything, below ground, to the main sewer line. We haven't had hot water for 10 days (the heater had to be pulled) and just got back our kitchen sink yesterday.

$13, 000 is the estimate on top of the $10 we just dropped on the new heating/ac system. I tell you renters, you may just want to stay renting...'cause when home problems crop up, they often can kick you right in the nads. I'm just numb.

JadeGiant
12-28-2010, 02:01 PM
man that is rough - sorry to hear about this.

nbr3bagshotrow
12-28-2010, 02:02 PM
Bummer. I also dropped $6500 for a new furnace and a/c. The $1500 tax credit will be some consolation.

protector2814
12-28-2010, 02:05 PM
Bummer. I also dropped $6500 for a new furnace and a/c. The $1500 tax credit will be some consolation.

That was nice.

warhead
12-28-2010, 02:25 PM
WOW thats a real bummer, but when all is said and done nothing will give you piece of mind like owning your own home, never having to worry about landlords or eviction, and knowing you are not paying someone elses mortgage lessens the load of paying a mortgage, the downside is these sometimes unexpected expenses.

JadeGiant
12-28-2010, 02:28 PM
WOW thats a real bummer, but when all is said and done nothing will give you piece of mind like owning your own home, never having to worry about landlords or eviction, and knowing you are not paying someone elses mortgage lessens the load of paying a mortgage, the downside is these sometimes unexpected expenses.

I agree with you completely, but when you have to drop 23k on your home with most of it not being an investment that appreciates the value of your home, you are sure to question that premise

Sinatra VonDoom
12-28-2010, 02:39 PM
I feel for you, these things suck big time. I had to have my entire house rewired when I first bought it...around 20k. Not a single cosmetic change that anyone could notice, but it had to be done. The house is around 115 years old and it needs around 75k worth of work. When I bought it the economy was riding high and I figured I would bang out a project a year. Now I'm just in a holding pattern daydreaming about insurance fraud. I loved my apartment downtown, loved my condo down the road but this house is a millstone around my neck:mad:

JadeGiant
12-28-2010, 02:41 PM
I feel for you, these things suck big time. I had to have my entire house rewired when I first bought it...around 20k. Not a single cosmetic change that anyone could notice, but it had to be done. The house is around 115 years old and it needs around 75k worth of work. When I bought it the economy was riding high and I figured I would bang out a project a year. Now I'm just in a holding pattern daydreaming about insurance fraud. I loved my apartment downtown, loved my condo down the road but this house is a millstone around my neck:mad:

75k worth of work that needs to be done or you have already done?

Sinatra VonDoom
12-28-2010, 02:46 PM
75k worth of work that needs to be done or you have already done?

Needs doing:vortex: Roof, front porch, side porch, driveway, walkway and the basement ohhhhh the basement. It was originally a dirt floor basement. The house was owned by one family though the generations, and they would slap some cement down themselves in a half assed way. The last guy died before getting around to it, the house came with several bags of cement. It is an absolute train wreck.

JadeGiant
12-28-2010, 02:51 PM
Needs doing:vortex: Roof, front porch, side porch, driveway, walkway and the basement ohhhhh the basement. It was originally a dirt floor basement. The house was owned by one family though the generations, and they would slap some cement down themselves in a half assed way. The last guy died before getting around to it, the house came with several bags of cement. It is an absolute train wreck.

oh man that is rough - you any good at repairs on your own or know anyone who could help? Is the 75k a price that covers cost and labor for all the repairs?

protector2814
12-28-2010, 03:03 PM
My peace of mind comes knowing that after the last truck drives off, my below ground pipes will be pvc, sound and stable. The bummer comes in having to come up with mega-cash when you least expect it. As a few of you may recall from an earlier thread, we also had a pretty nasty rain-fall flood earlier in the Summer.

What I liked about renting was that when something got broke, my landlord or super fixed it. Sure I know I'm not paying somebody elses mortgage, but...I'm kinda renting my house from the bank that ownes my note 'til we pay her off. It really wont be "my house" 'til she's free and clear.

What's unsettling is the now almost constant thought of what may be coming next. What's down the road? That'll freak you out as a homeowner.

Don't get me wrong, I love my house...but damnnnnnn, they can bite you in the a$$ when you're least ready for it.

Sinatra VonDoom
12-28-2010, 03:04 PM
oh man that is rough - you any good at repairs on your own or know anyone who could help? Is the 75k a price that covers cost and labor for all the repairs?

I honestly can't swing a hammer. My father could build an addition on a house from foundation up, including plumbing and wiring. I spent two weekends back dropping f-bombs while trying to assemble an ikea type kitchen kart.:laugh:

The 75k is based on a few estimates I had done 3 years ago, it will end up being more of course. The bulk of it is the basement, and I'm just going to forget that for a few years. I'll do the roof next summer and the front porch the year after hopefully. I guess those are the only things that NEED doing.

It's a great house don't get me wrong. Old houses can just be huge money sinks. The ironic thing is this house wasn't a fixer upper like one of the others I was looking at.

Sinatra VonDoom
12-28-2010, 03:06 PM
My peace of mind comes knowing that after the last truck drives off, my below ground pipes will be pvc, sound and stable. The bummer comes in having to come up with mega-cash when you least expect it. As a few of you may recall from an earlier thread, we also had a pretty nasty rain-fall flood earlier in the Summer.

What I liked about renting was that when something got broke, my landlord or super fixed it. Sure I know I'm not paying somebody elses mortgage, but...I'm kinda renting my house from the bank that ownes my note 'til we pay her off. It really wont be "my house" 'til she's free and clear.

What's unsettling is the now almost constant thought of what may be coming next. What's down the road? That'll freak you out as a homeowner.

Don't get me wrong, I love my house...but damnnnnnn, they can bite you in the a$$ when you're least ready for it.

I hear you brother. The house is just a box. The home is made up of all the great memories you make inside it.

JadeGiant
12-28-2010, 03:10 PM
I honestly can't swing a hammer. My father could build an addition on a house from foundation up, including plumbing and wiring. I spent two weekends back dropping f-bombs while trying to assemble an ikea type kitchen kart.:laugh:

The 75k is based on a few estimates I had done 3 years ago, it will end up being more of course. The bulk of it is the basement, and I'm just going to forget that for a few years. I'll do the roof next summer and the front porch the year after hopefully. I guess those are the only things that NEED doing.

It's a great house don't get me wrong. Old houses can just be huge money sinks. The ironic thing is this house wasn't a fixer upper like one of the others I was looking at.

you crack me up Charlie! My pops was pretty handy as well but he is not here to help so I either try it myself or get someone to help out. I am having my bro-n-law out this Spring for a day to do some projects - plumbing and garage door opener. I told him I would pop for the pizza and wings so he is more than happy to come out.

My house is only 11 years old so the repair is minimal. Mainly home improvement stuff - I am going to tackle hardwood floors either this year or next. If I get really ambitious I might do new baseboards and trim as well.

JadeGiant
12-28-2010, 03:10 PM
I hear you brother. The house is just a box. The home is made up of all the great memories you make inside it.

QFT!

nbr3bagshotrow
12-28-2010, 03:12 PM
Yeah, it's the waiting. I've got a roof I'm sure in the next few years will need replacing (come on hail storm), some bathroom work needing fixed (my monthly grout patches aren't going to hold forever). And windows. Some of the seals on the double pane are starting to lose their seal.

protector2814
12-28-2010, 03:17 PM
Yeah, we've had our 1st pinhole leak in the main plumbing line(s), so I kinda already know what's coming down the road. Roof we replaced 4 years back. I do some handy work but stop at electric and plumbing. I can install a dimmer switch, change a lock, hang a door, crap like that. It's the expensive stuff I have no clue about :confused:

If we average it out and I factor in all the "unexpected" projects that have dropped in our lap since buying our home 10-11 years ago, I'd say we've dropped an extra 5-6 grand a year into it on top of the mortgage (hopefully this # will drop as we fix the big stuff that breaks). This is the kind of math a future home buyer should also factor in before purchasing. Just 'cause you can afford the note, taxes, insurance, etc...you should also leave room for the "oh dammits". Everything lasts about 8 - 10 years nowadays.

Sinatra VonDoom
12-28-2010, 03:28 PM
Yeah, we've had our 1st pinhole leak in the main plumbing line(s), so I kinda already know what's coming down the road. Roof we replaced 4 years back. I do some handy work but stop at electric and plumbing. I can install a dimmer switch, change a lock, hang a door, crap like that. It's the expensive stuff I have no clue about :confused:

I wont even look at anything involving electricity or plumbing, as far as I'm concerned they work by magic. My gal wanted dimmer switches in a few rooms and insisted I could do it myself. After having seen me fail for over a decade at anything more complicated than changing a light bulb I suspect she was trying to kill me off.

No joke back in high school shop class when they plugged in the lamp I made out of a mountain dew can the circuit breaker killed the lights.

JadeGiant
12-28-2010, 03:30 PM
I wont even look at anything involving electricity or plumbing, as far as I'm concerned they work by magic. My gal wanted dimmer switches in a few rooms and insisted I could do it myself. After having seen me fail for over a decade at anything more complicated than changing a light bulb I suspect she was trying to kill me off.

me either! Too much downside = fire and flooding ... I want someone bonded.

Averone
12-28-2010, 03:35 PM
I wont even look at anything involving electricity or plumbing, as far as I'm concerned they work by magic. My gal wanted dimmer switches in a few rooms and insisted I could do it myself. After having seen me fail for over a decade at anything more complicated than changing a light bulb I suspect she was trying to kill me off.

No joke back in high school shop class when they plugged in the lamp I made out of a mountain dew can the circuit breaker killed the lights.

:hilarious:

TNovak
12-28-2010, 03:48 PM
This last year alone I replaced all of the windows and siding, the central air unit, and the shingles on the roof.

I didn't need to do the siding and windows, but they could use it and this was the last year for me to take advantage of the commie lib tax deduction for upgrading energy efficiency.

Owning a house is an expensive game. Even if it is new. I owned a brand new house from construction to about 5 yrs old once. No repairs but special assessments just kick you in the arse hard :dork:

Sinatra VonDoom
12-28-2010, 03:52 PM
me either! Too much downside = fire and flooding ... I want someone bonded.

Yeah, then you have to make the call of shame and get a professional to fix your screw up. Then Joe Monkewrench is going to look at me like I'm the worlds biggest idiot...this is up for debate...and make me explain to him what hell I did and why did I do it. Not that I have been in that situation before:confused2

Jesse321
12-28-2010, 04:05 PM
OUCH!

This year, we're going to take apart our hall bathroom, taking out the tub and installing a shower, and I just know we're going to find rot in the walls behind the shower.

MONSTER
12-28-2010, 05:02 PM
funny this thread came up today. I'm actually having the carpet and pad replaced in my downstairs bedroom My daughter clogged the toilet with too much toilet paper and it flooded everything. Thankfully I caught it before it got to the walls.

warhead
12-28-2010, 06:07 PM
There is always something in the house that needs fixing, the freakin work never stops, I just try to be vigilant to catch the work when its minor before it gets to major, it helps that a good friend is a house doctor and really micro inspected our house before we bought it 10 years ago.

MONSTER
12-28-2010, 06:56 PM
There is always something in the house that needs fixing, the freakin work never stops, I just try to be vigilant to catch the work when its minor before it gets to major, it helps that a good friend is a house doctor and really micro inspected our house before we bought it 10 years ago.

absolutely. I try and tackle the small stuff as soon as it happens so that way it doesn't pile up on me.

protector2814
12-28-2010, 06:57 PM
funny this thread came up today. I'm actually having the carpet and pad replaced in my downstairs bedroom My daughter clogged the toilet with too much toilet paper and it flooded everything. Thankfully I caught it before it got to the walls.

Trust me bro, I wish this thread never started. :banghead:

MONSTER
12-28-2010, 07:00 PM
Trust me bro, I wish this thread never started. :banghead:

yeah I definitely feel for you. Does your homeowners insurance cover it?

My home is only 5 years old and I happen to work for the builder so if anything goes wrong I know exactly who to call.

protector2814
12-30-2010, 12:35 PM
yeah I definitely feel for you. Does your homeowners insurance cover it?

My home is only 5 years old and I happen to work for the builder so if anything goes wrong I know exactly who to call.

The plumbers have left the building. The 8 day job ended this a.m.. We paid 'em and the job did come in on the estimate which was good. Bad/unforseen $ outputs came in three's in 2010, hopefully 2011 it won't come at all.

Still, glad to have it behind us.

Monster, we're in the process of figuring out the homeowners insurance angle. Gotta see if they'll accept plus what the potential claim might do to our annual.

nexus
12-30-2010, 01:37 PM
Our house hits the 11 year mark this year. It's an extremely well built home in a very desirable neighborhood, but small things are now starting to mount--plumbing:banghead: , fiber rewiring (I'm on CAT-5), a gas generator since we lose power if you sneeze the wrong way, pool repairs, etc. We have a 3-acre rental property about 7 miles away (bought at the wrong end of the market, but has still held most of its value) with a 30-year-old house that is a money :vortex: . Anyhoo, we're now looking at selling the main house, knocking down the rental and building something brand spankin' new on that land. Already working with an architect on designs and we can build based on what we've learned in the past ten years, plus make it green and so energy efficient I will be able to actually sell back to the utility co. Only problem is it will add at least another 15-20 minutes to my commute, unless I buy a blinkin' helicopter, learn how to fly it, and not get shot down since I work in DC :).Oh well, there are always trade offs.

Babytoxie
01-02-2011, 11:32 AM
Friggin' sewer lines... it seemed like all the houses in our old neighborhood were having problems with them: backing up, collapsing, whatever. Luckily, we were able to sell our house and get out without encountering any problems, and I think we may have dodged a bullet there.

protector2814
01-29-2011, 01:20 PM
Day four w/o any power. No phone (land-line's out too), heat, fridge, stove, anything. Just threw out the last of the food I purchased the day before the snow. Our energy company (PEPCO) is just killin' us. I'm on my sister's computer for a few minutes. Bed at 7:30 every night w/ the kids now in some sort of fight with each other hourly. I'm betting Sunday night to early next week for the power back on. Not even a truck anywhere near us w/ lines down everywhere. Oh well........

warhead
01-29-2011, 01:48 PM
WOW, hope things get better.

protector2814
01-29-2011, 01:57 PM
"F" it...I don't even care. This is the new normal, as far as I'm concerned.

Just gonna assume that w/ every storm above a 4, we're gonna loose power for days. It's been like this almost for the past 10 years. The infrastructure of the country is decaying w/ no $ nor incentive to fix it.
My neighborhood is just ahead of the curve. If I sound grumpy, it's because I am.

But thanks, Warhead. I do appreciate the thought. : - )

risingstar
01-30-2011, 08:18 PM
In 2010, we had to replace the hot water tank and the heat pump. Don't even get me started on the maintennance of the house grounds and pool. Yeesh. There are times when I miss the days when it was just Cecilia and myself in our 2 bedroom apartment in the city. It's now ten years and two kids later and we have more expenses than we ever dreamed. Holy moley. Retirement should be lots of fun... lol.

However, truth be told, when I'm playing hockey outside with my daughter Selina or watching her name all the statues around the house or just simply hearing her laughter, I forget all about it.

:)

cblakey1
01-31-2011, 06:19 AM
"F" it...I don't even care. This is the new normal, as far as I'm concerned.

Just gonna assume that w/ every storm above a 4, we're gonna loose power for days. It's been like this almost for the past 10 years. The infrastructure of the country is decaying w/ no $ nor incentive to fix it.
My neighborhood is just ahead of the curve. If I sound grumpy, it's because I am.

But thanks, Warhead. I do appreciate the thought. : - )

I think it's just Silver Spring, man. My boy who lives out there had the promise of electricity returning late Sunday night. Did it happen for you yet?

You guys really need to raise hell with the powers that be in Montgomery County. That is unacceptable to let Pepco write their own ticket at the expense of 200,000 homes.

cblakey1
01-31-2011, 06:24 AM
I've always bought new and never stayed in a home long enough to realize any real problems.

'Course the first week I was in my latest "new" home we had to have the basement torn out. Turns out the guys who pour the foundation for the house also filled one of the outgoing sewage pipes with concrete (pretty common with these idiots), so the first week in my new crib found us washing dishes in bathroom sinks and bathtubs on the side of the house where the other sewage pipe was. :banghead:

C. Bormann
02-01-2011, 08:20 PM
I bought my house 3 1/2 years ago. I am in the process of gutting and remodeling it room by room.

Some days I think I got a bargain, and some days I think I got screwed.

Nidgit
02-01-2011, 08:40 PM
My brother's just about to loose his . . . built his dream house in Cairns (far north Queensland) and they are expecting a massive cyclone in the next 24 hours. They are all safe, but he is expecting major damage (best case) or total destruction.

risingstar
02-02-2011, 11:53 AM
My brother's just about to loose his . . . built his dream house in Cairns (far north Queensland) and they are expecting a massive cyclone in the next 24 hours. They are all safe, but he is expecting major damage (best case) or total destruction.



Holy! Let's hope everything turns out okay!

nbr3bagshotrow
02-02-2011, 11:58 AM
This last year alone I replaced all of the windows and siding, the central air unit, and the shingles on the roof.

I didn't need to do the siding and windows, but they could use it and this was the last year for me to take advantage of the commie lib tax deduction for upgrading energy efficiency.

Owning a house is an expensive game. Even if it is new. I owned a brand new house from construction to about 5 yrs old once. No repairs but special assessments just kick you in the arse hard :dork:

I put in a super high efficiency furnace and A/C back in September and as I compare this years gas/electric bills with last years I'm sure not finding much energy efficiency. :sly2:

protector2814
02-02-2011, 02:06 PM
Nidgit, wish your brother the best from all of us. Here I am complaining about busted pipes and no power and your bro. is worried about loosing his whole darn house. Puts things in perspective. I'll be sending out the positive vibes and pray he dodges it.

Argonus
02-02-2011, 02:29 PM
I definitely know I could be a Home Inspector.. when I bought my house in Oregon, ours missed a few.. amusing... features. Couldn't have asked for a more awesome yard, though.

I gotta say, though.. nothing's more fun that increasing its value via Home Depot. :D

I'll be buying another house soon enough, though.. probably in coastal California (ie my 1,800 sq. ft. house will be reduced to an 800 sq. ft. house). :hilarious:

Argonus
02-02-2011, 02:31 PM
My brother's just about to loose his . . . built his dream house in Cairns (far north Queensland) and they are expecting a massive cyclone in the next 24 hours. They are all safe, but he is expecting major damage (best case) or total destruction.

Wow.. our thoughts are with him and his.

Thank God he and his family are safe, at least.

TNovak
02-02-2011, 03:38 PM
I put in a super high efficiency furnace and A/C back in September and as I compare this years gas/electric bills with last years I'm sure not finding much energy efficiency. :sly2:

Me too. I did new siding with supposed high efficiency under wrap, new windows, new central air and I am paying as much in utilities as before and it hasn't been as cold this year. Go figure.

Nidgit, wish your brother the best from all of us. Here I am complaining about busted pipes and no power and your bro. is worried about loosing his whole darn house. Puts things in perspective. I'll be sending out the positive vibes and pray he dodges it.

+1 :goodpost:

I definitely know I could be a Home Inspector.. when I bought my house in Oregon, ours missed a few.. amusing... features. Couldn't have asked for a more awesome yard, though.

I gotta say, though.. nothing's more fun that increasing its value via Home Depot. :D

I'll be buying another house soon enough, though.. probably in coastal California (ie my 1,800 sq. ft. house will be reduced to an 800 sq. ft. house). :hilarious:

I hope you get a great house Argonus

Glad to see you are keeping your spirits up and a good attitude :thumbs2:

Nidgit
02-03-2011, 04:57 AM
Holy! Let's hope everything turns out okay!

Nidgit, wish your brother the best from all of us. Here I am complaining about busted pipes and no power and your bro. is worried about loosing his whole darn house. Puts things in perspective. I'll be sending out the positive vibes and pray he dodges it.

Wow.. our thoughts are with him and his.

Thank God he and his family are safe, at least.

Thanks guys. I spoke to him today and their area seems to have been spared the worst so far. Some areas were really hammered though. Feel really bad for the people of Queensland. In the past few weeks, they had record flooding and now Cyclone &$&?ing Yasi !!!

Can sympathize with everyone's home ownership woes. We came home a few weeks ago to find our place flooded. Looks like when our place was built the builders used the floor drain for all sorts of garbage. Came home one night to find a lovely little river running through our place. Still, if that's the worst thing to happen, I don't have much to b!tch about. Doesn't come close to some of the stuff you guys are having to manage :eek:

Makkari1
02-09-2011, 01:51 PM
So, maybe a year ago, I start smelling sewage in my basement laundry room. I have the plumbers out a few times. They couldn't find anything, yet the smell persists and I just feel in my bones that something is terribly wrong. Long story short - we have our heating and cooling system replaced a month back ($$$) and the tech. smells the smell and traces in to the trap door behind our basement tub. Ten days ago, the plumbers come in with the jack hammers and, after tearing up our laundry room and basement bath floor, that our house has settled on the back side, crushing and snapping the brittle, 50 year old pipes connecting just about everything to the sewer line. Everything we've flushed or washed down a sink for gosh knows how long, has ended up in the ground below our home, further washing away the ground, causing even more settling and damage.

They've replaced pretty much everything, below ground, to the main sewer line. We haven't had hot water for 10 days (the heater had to be pulled) and just got back our kitchen sink yesterday.

$13, 000 is the estimate on top of the $10 we just dropped on the new heating/ac system. I tell you renters, you may just want to stay renting...'cause when home problems crop up, they often can kick you right in the nads. I'm just numb.

I'm sorry to hear about this. You are no the first person to go through this. The company I worked for has a similar problem with old pipes and a nasty smell that won't go away. The plummers suspect leaking old pipes that are very old and need to be replaced.

The good thing about home ownership is that you are not paying endless rent on something that you'll never own. The one consolation that you have is that if or when you sell your house you can include the cost of the new pipes and work in the sales price since it would be considered a upgrade.