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Old 04-20-2010, 06:28 PM   #1
cblakey1
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Any Gardener, Hortoculturist or arborist here?

I bought a couple of Junipers about a month ago and planted them. In a month's time, they seem to be dying.

The undergrowth has turned yellowish brown and seem to be hanging on (vs. dry and falling off).

I see today that this is starting to go to the outer branches.

I've never had problems planting before and I thought trees pretty much took care of themselves (with proper watering of course). I've tried to find the problem on the web but pretty much came up with fungus and root rot (none of which I believe they have).

Do any of you have experience with trees? Junipers in particular? I thought maybe they were getting acclimated and would be better when the weather gets warmer but they seem to be taking a turn for the worse not better.

Is it normal for them to get some discoloration/dead undergrowth?

Thx.

tree


branch


undergrowth
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Old 04-21-2010, 04:51 PM   #2
Jesse321
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It could be 1 of 2 things ... either you're over watering them, or your soil might be low on Magnesium.


Stop watering them for a week, and in the next watering cycle, take a couple of table spoons of Epsom Salt and mix it in a gallon of water ... ES is actually Magnesium Sulfate, sprinkle that mix on around the tree no further away than a foot, so the MS can get into the soil around the expanding base roots.


Alternate one regular water cycle with one ES treatment for 3 cycles ... then stop watering for a week, and see what happens.

Hope it helps.
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Old 04-21-2010, 05:27 PM   #3
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Yeah, sorry cblakey1, I garden and grow but have had bad luck w/ Junipers. I had one in my front yard when I moved in this house but did very little to maintain it. I do recall it being the 1st to show the effects of dry-spells. The shrub/tree did brown easily yet always seemed to bounce back. 5 or so years back, we had 50+ mile an hour winds come up in a freak summer storm. The juniper was completely uprooted and tipped over. I chopped her up and planted roses. Good luck with them. I hope they come back strong.
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Old 04-21-2010, 06:04 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jesse321 View Post
It could be 1 of 2 things ... either you're over watering them, or your soil might be low on Magnesium.


Stop watering them for a week, and in the next watering cycle, take a couple of table spoons of Epsom Salt and mix it in a gallon of water ... ES is actually Magnesium Sulfate, sprinkle that mix on around the tree no further away than a foot, so the MS can get into the soil around the expanding base roots.


Alternate one regular water cycle with one ES treatment for 3 cycles ... then stop watering for a week, and see what happens.

Hope it helps.
I haven't watered them much. I usually throw 'em in the ground and let nature take over.

I do however have ES and will start treatment this weekend. Great pointer!

Quote:
Originally Posted by protector2814 View Post
Yeah, sorry cblakey1, I garden and grow but have had bad luck w/ Junipers. I had one in my front yard when I moved in this house but did very little to maintain it. I do recall it being the 1st to show the effects of dry-spells. The shrub/tree did brown easily yet always seemed to bounce back. 5 or so years back, we had 50+ mile an hour winds come up in a freak summer storm. The juniper was completely uprooted and tipped over. I chopped her up and planted roses. Good luck with them. I hope they come back strong.
When I moved in I had a couple juniper bushes out front and transplanted them to the back yard not really caring of they survived cuz the bushes can easily get out of hand. Well, six years later, they have gone nuts and I have to cut 'em back every spring. Go figure!
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Old 08-21-2011, 05:56 PM   #5
Freon
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I have one of those. Planted it 2 years ago in the front yard in the north closer to the foundation so it doesn't get much sun at all. I almost never water it, just let nature do its thing. It hasn't grown or died. It just sits there, remaining completely neutral lol.
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Old 05-30-2014, 12:24 PM   #6
protector2814
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"F"in Poison Ivy this year. It's everywhere in the woods behind my house & while I can spot it a mile away, my dog is traipsin' through-it on our walks & is bringing the oil in on her coat. I've pretty much had it somewhere on my arms & legs since early May. I keep forgetting & play w/ her later in the day. No one else in the family is getting it from her.
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Old 05-30-2014, 02:19 PM   #7
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That looks like a Skyrocket Juniper. If you are not watering a newly transplanted plant, then it is most likely dying from drought. Most plants require a vigorous watering regimen the first year to become established. For the first year, it will need a deep watering at least once per week, and possibly more often depending on the climate, unless you have dependable, regular precipitation. Over-watering will usually have the symptoms of greenery getting yellowed and limp. Under-watering will cause the greenery to turn brown and brittle. Letting nature take over might work regularly with small bedding plants or sapling trees, but that tree has way too much greenery to support to leave it to chance.

It looks like this thread is pretty old, but still good information for the future.
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